Friday, March 27, 2015

PARAPHILATELIC MAIL ART/ A letter posted to Perf from Unperf by Eric Whollem/ Digtital Illusionism/ Virtual Fantasy Cover





LETTER POSTED TO PERF FROM UNPERF
Outer Artsikraphtsi Local Post
Eric Whollem
paraphilatelic cyber mail
2015
copyright by the artist

FROM PERF TO UNPERF

This virtual letter to Kattie's Kraft Shoppe on Ubikwittus Void Lane in Perf, Outer Artsikraphtsi, bears a cybergenetically enhanced handstamp saying 'Philatelic Mail; Handle With Care.' The outer edges of this envelope are a bit rough from handling, but the cyber cancellation is clear.

This virtual cover is a display of digital illusionism.

The letter is posted with return address at the Pirate's Lair. This is a small  island to the north, Found only by mariners lost in the Paraphilatelic Sea.


MAP OF OUTER ARTSIKRAFTSHI
2015
Eric Whollem
perforated edtion/ local post
copyright by the artist

Map of Artsikraphtsi
2015
Eric Whollem
perforated edtion/ local post
copyright by the artist


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Wednesday, March 25, 2015

FAUX POSTAGE STAMPS AND COVERS/ A Map Stamp from Poste Mahdern by Eric Whollem/ Virtual Mail Art/ CYBERSTAMPS


 POSTE MAHDERN
Paraphilatelic Mail from Pop to Op
2015
Eric Whollem
digital stamp and cancellation art
copyright by the artist


POSTE MAHDERN
2015
Map Stamp
Eric Whollem
cyber edition
copyright by the artist

A MAP STAMP FROM POSTE MAHDERN

This stamp and cover are both digitally realized images. As such they could be considered cyberstamp or virtual stamp art. This is slightly different than conventional mail art, where actual covers are sent through the mail.

Op Art and Pop Art are aspects of modern art from the sixties, which influenced stamp designers, especially with the popularized concept of Serial Art. Warhol's Soup Can series influenced many stamp designers, especially in the Artistamp groups that were forming in the seventies and eighties.

Nevertheless serial art has an ancient place in art history. Examples are too numerous to mention. A good one is Naza textile art.

The stamp on the virtual cover is an imperforate variety. The map is an example of my own digital art imagery. Binky O'Tool is a fantasy name for the creator of this stamp and cover, essentially one of my pseudonyms. Binky O'Tool I posit as the head of what I fancifully call Feral Impressions, a stamp production service for my own paraphilatelic fantasies of the moment.

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Monday, March 16, 2015

FAUX POSTAGE STAMPS/ Feral Republic by Eric Whollem/ 'Bupp'/ Cyberstamps



 BUPP
Feral Republic Postal Administration
Eric Whollem
2015
copyright by the artist
  BUPP
Feral Republic Postal Administration
Eric Whollem
2015
copyright by the artist
  BUPP
Feral Republic Postal Administration
Eric Whollem
2015
copyright by the artist
 BUPP
Feral Republic Postal Administration
Eric Whollem
2015
copyright by the artist


THE FERAL REPUBLIC



The Feral Republic is found on an isle in the Paraphilatelic Ocean. It has no capital city, as all that can be found that resembles a town or village is a lone structure that serves as a Provisional Post Office. This facility is used only in times of national emergency, such as when mail is received from abroad, a rare event in the Feral Republic in these days of text messages, etc.. insofar as a single human inhabitant inhabits this isle, much as in the manner of those Scottish rocks with thin topsoil, seeking postal recognition. 

The Feral Republic does not seek such postal validity from any official or nonofficial entity, as the spirit of the Feral people is that of Wild Beasts. One might note the various lands that lie across the sea from the Feral Republic, such as Artsikraphtsi, and the Kyootsi Wootsi Peninsula.

To the west is a nefarious unnamed isle called the Pirate's Lair. To the northwest is Poste Mahdern, a curious island with two port cities named Op and  Pop, etc. The village of Phluks is on an island to the northeast. Directly to the east is Lower Kavellinia, a large landmass, whose capital is Pollywollydoodle. The Bay of Lower Kavellinia has two towns: Bobtail and Nag. The Casinos in these towns bring much revenue to the land.

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Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Tuesday, January 27, 2015

CONCOW MAIDU LEGEND OF PUCHANO/ by Eric Whollem/ DIGITAL PAINTING/ Native American Folklore




PUCHANO
1998-2014
Eric Whollem
digitally remastered mixed media painting
copyright by the artist


THE LEGEND OF PUCHANO

The story of Pe-uch-ano as found on the Maidu.com website relates how
the Maidu in their wanderings had gone far from We-lu-da, their ancestral
homeland. Through the prayers and leadership of Pe-uch-ano and his wife
Um-wa-na-ta they crossed over the Trinity River and finally returned to
We-lu-da. The Trinity is called Ani-ka-to in the Koncow Maidu language.
Ani-ka-to is the Konkow Maidu 'River Jordan.'

The Konkow Valley people also believe that a Christ-like teacher of wisdom
named Yane-ka-num-ka-la came at one time to teach the people. He was
later followed by two men from the cold reaches of the north--the realm
of Yu-dic-na. These latter two men were also spiritual teachers of the
Koncow.

In the teachings of the Nome Cult of Konkow Valley 'Sahm' is the name
given to the great destructive fire sent by the Great Spirit to punish
mankind for wrongdoings. Pe-uch-ano and his wife were legendarily two
lone survivors of Sahm, which anciently came to destroy the land. The
children of Pe-uch-ano and Um-wa-na-ta became the progenitors of the
renewed  Koncow people. The children of Pe-uch-ano and his wife took
them at their last request to see the flowerland of We-lu-da beyond the
Trinity River.

The Maidu apparently dwelled not far from Mt. Shasta in the old days;
other legends of the Maidu also speak of Shasta, which is called 'Kom'
in the Maidu language. Was the realm of Yu-dic-na related to the snowy
peak of Mt. Shasta? An interesting question.

The Trinity River is far north of Butte County; there is evidence that the
Maidu people may have had a nomadic history, having travelled through
various parts of California. Some speculate that they are related to the
Reed Boat Builders, who are a group distantly linked to the Mayans of
the far south. Other speculations say that they are involved in migrations
through Utah. Others accounts say they moved down from Oregon. The
Reed Boat People are referred to as the Penutians. Other tribal groups,
such as the Hopi Indians, have a whole mythos built around the subject
of migration, which to them is a sacred manifestation of the cosmic order
of  life.

Despite the varying views as to the distant origins of the People, there is
no dispute as to their Butte County heritage, which is well established
as a part of California history. The Mooretown site has been dated at
3500 years of continuous habitation, for example.


TO READ MORE ABOUT THE MAIDU INDIANS SEE:
http://artblogericwhollem.blogspot.com/search/label/maidu%20indians
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